Responding to Capitalism’s Wars at Home and Abroad: Sunday, January 14, 2018

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Courtesy Fernando Martí, Justseeds

Sunday, January 14, 2018, 6:15 PM

Art Share

801 East Fourth Place (Arts District), Los Ángeles

(Free parking in roof lot across the street on Hewitt St. by the Aztec calendar, also accessible by Metro)

Sponsored by the Coalition for Peace, Revolution, and Social Justice (CPRSJ)

Speakers:

Hamid Khan, Stop LAPD Spying Campaign, on domestic surveillance

Maureen Cruise and Kirsten Magnuson, Health Care for All-Los Angeles, beyond Obamacare

Kevin B. Anderson, UCSB Professor and CPRSJ, on Trump’s wars and war threats

Ali Kiani, International Marxist-Humanist Organization, on Iranian uprising

The thoroughly reactionary processes put into motion by the Trump regime range from wars, threats of wars, and an increase in the international arms trade, to the wars on working people and people of color here in the U.S. These include increased police surveillance and the attempts to abolish Obamacare. Trump’s open support of racial and gender hierarchies and of authoritarianism represent, along with his economic nationalism, new politics with fascist overtones. But the way for these policies was prepared by a series of neoliberal administrations, from Clinton, to Bush, to Obama. And while the U.S. is by far the world’s largest and most aggressive imperialist power, it is not alone in threatening or making war, or in repressing its people and lowering its living standards. This has been shown by the uprising by Iranian workers. We need to rise up, not by fighting for a return to the neoliberal Obama years, but by deepening the struggle against both Trump and the system that produced him.

Sponsors of the CPRSJ:

Black Rose/Rosa Negra Anarchist Federation-Los Angeles

Campus Marxist-Humanists, UCSB

International Marxist-Humanist Organization, West Coast Chapter

Socialist Party, Los Angeles Local

Members of Solidarity: A Socialist, Feminist, Anti-Racist Organization, Los Angeles Branch

Links:

https://www.facebook.com/CPRSJ/

https://cprsj.wordpress.com/

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Javier Sethness, “Communalist, Autonomous, and Indigenous Movements in Latin America: Concrete Hope for an Alternative to Capitalism”

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Javier Sethness, Black Rose/Rosa Negra Anarchist Federation

Comments presented at the July 14 launch of the Coalition for Peace, Revolution and Social Justice at a public meeting at the Westside Peace Center, Culver City

Communalism: relating to the community or Commune; referring to communal or popular power; also collectivism

Autonomy: resisting the State and capital

Indigenous: Native, non-mestizo; most oppressed

“Concrete hope”: Ernst Bloch, The Principle of Hopeconcrete utopia

  • “concrete” here in its Hegelian sense as con crescere, a dialectical growing together of tendencies and latencies
  • The struggle for liberation is a constant effort to realize “the Not-Yet-Become, towards viable possibilities of the light”

 

The following is an excerpt from the introduction to Angel Cappelletti’s Anarchism in Latin America, forthcoming from AK Press. Reproduced with permission.

 

The environmentalist and ecological movements in Latin America have produced their own martyrs, including Chico Mendes and Berta Cáceres, as well as Mariano Abarca and Bernardo Vásquez Sánchez, anti-mining organizers from Chiapas and Oaxaca, respectively, together with countless others. Indeed, ecologists and land-defenders have been singled out for repression at the hands of States and private interests in Latin America, with hundreds of organizers killed annually in the past few years. The severity of such suppression reflects the fears of the ruling classes regarding the potential for autonomous indigenous, communalist, and anarchist movements engaging in radical ecological praxis: recovering and communizing the land, expropriating the expropriators, employing agroecology, abolishing or at least minimizing alienated labor, completely redistributing wealth and resources, redesigning the cities for collective living and sustainability, overthrowing pollution and productivism, halting economic growth, delineating biosphere reserves, and equilibrating the overall relationship between humanity and nature.

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Frieda Afary, “How Did We Go from the Arab Spring and the Occupy Movement to the Destruction of the Syrian Revolution and the Global Rise of Racist Authoritarianism?”

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Frieda Afary, Alliance of Syrian and Iranian Socialists

Comments presented at the July 14 launch of the Coalition for Peace, Revolution and Social Justice at a public meeting at the Westside Peace Center, Culver City

In 2011, the world was abuzz with the spirit of the Arab Spring, a revolutionary movement for social justice, freedom and human dignity which aimed to overthrow authoritarian states in the Middle East.   This movement seemed to come out of nowhere but was actually the result of decades of deep mass dissatisfaction with worsening poverty and political repression under authoritarian regimes such as those of Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Syria.

The revolts in Tunisia and in Egypt involved the participation of youth and women as well as large labor unions. They led to the overthrow of the dictators, Ben Ali in Tunisia and Mubarak in Egypt.   The uprising in Syria against the regime of Bashar al-Assad had the most diverse composition, involving youth, workers, women, and not only the Sunni Arab majority but also the Kurds, an oppressed national minority, as well as members of the Alawite Muslim minority, Christians, Assyrians and the Druze Shi-a community.   The Arab Spring was really a Middle Eastern Spring that involved non-Arabs and even extended to protests against poverty and corruption in Israel. It was also preceded by the Iranian Green movement, a mass protest movement against the fraudulent presidential election in 2009 which lasted several months before it was brutally crushed by the Iranian government.

Continue reading “Frieda Afary, “How Did We Go from the Arab Spring and the Occupy Movement to the Destruction of the Syrian Revolution and the Global Rise of Racist Authoritarianism?””